Martin Fütterer

Seven Rooms
March 2015

In his abstract video clip Seven Rooms Martin Fütterer visualizes several different soundscapes. Abstract animations flow into a light installation, and warm sounds bring a room to life. The room itself becomes part of the staging, and clocks what happens in it. In the music for this film field recordings meet digital synthesizers, and instruments meet programmed sounds. Seven Rooms combines live action with computer animations.

Seven Rooms was rewarded the Young Talent Award 2016 by the Art Director's Club Germany, and a Bronze Award in the Final Project category at the New German Director's Showcase 2016.

Seven Rooms is the diploma project of Martin Fütterer in the Motion Design post-graduate program at the Baden-Württemberg Film Academy, and supervised by Prof. Manfred Becker and me.

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Paul Brenner

Eidolozän [Eidolozene]
March 2015

The Eidolozene is a geochronological geological age in the distant future. In his artistic research film Eidolozän [Eidolozene] Paul Brenner explores the life of humanity in a future determined by virtual reality. The influence of virtuality on human evolution, social interaction, and reproduction are discussed.

Eidolozän [Eidolozene] is the diploma project of Paul Brenner in the Motion Design post-graduate program at the Baden-Württemberg Film Academy, and supervised by Prof. Manfred Becker and me.

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Three professors

Nina Juric, Gregor Kuschmirz and Mareike Ottrand
March 2015

The first three of my students who emerged from the Motion Design postgraduate program at Germany's leading film school Filmakademie Baden-Württemberg were appointed professor:

Nina Juric is tenured professor for Image and Motion at the Köln International School of Design.

Gregor Kuschmirz is visiting professors for Motion Image at the design department of the University of Applied Scienes in Münster.

Mareike Ottrand is tenured professor for Interactive Illustration and Games at the Hamburg University of Applied Sciences' design department.

Had the great pleasure of working with them during their studies in Motion Design, supervised their final exams, and couldn't be more proud! I have been chairing the Motion Design program since 1998, and we will continue to incubate more excellence in design, and teaching.

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Milan Schell

WRESTLING!
March 2015

The installation and composition WRESTLING! by Milan Schell is an audiovisual music and fight simulation staged in space. The media lamp (visual) and loudspeaker (audio) represent two opponents who can be heard and seen trying to influence each other while attempting to gain the upper hand. The work is an example of anti-synesthetic composition: as the two audio-visual methods synchronicity and analogy are not used to combine stimuli or intensify them but instead used as a mode of interaction by two equal communication systems. The objective is to create audio-visual polyphony through the individuality and interconnection of both media channels, which could also be referred to as separate audio and visual voices.

There are five sections planned for the composition. The video shows the work-in-progress at the time of the bachelor’s degree thesis.

Supervised WRESTLING! in my Visual Music class together with IMM assistant professor Andreas Kolinski at the Institute For Music And Media.

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Gregor Keinenburg

Gestalt [Form]
February 2015

Gestalt is an attempt by Gregor Keinenburg to apply musical serialism to the composition of movement sequences. The challenge lies in creating movements that can be performed forwards, backwards and even upside down while retaining a certain aesthetic quality. The mirrors reflect the relationship between the four figures of a series, all reflections of each other.

Supervised Gestalt in my Visual Music class together with Prof. Ulla Barthold and IMM assistant professor Andreas Kolinski at the Institute For Music And Media.

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Lukas Reichert

Eigendynamik [Momentum]
February 2015

The sound sculpture Eigendynamik by Lukas Reichert portrays a dynamic system created by simulated feedback. A rotating motor makes the steel sheet vibrate, and this is recorded by a microphone. The signal is analysed and interpreted by a computer. The amplitude of the vibration determines the movement of the sheet, the visualization on it, and the motor’s pattern structure. The visualization is a simple wave form representation in real time and in rest periods moves with an intensity determined by the previous sound level. Similarly, the computer uses the amplitude to calculate the length of the next vibration and rest phases. Following a loud signal there is a shorter phase, after a quiet signal, a longer one.

Supervised Eigendynamik in my Visual Music class together with IMM assistant professor Andreas Kolinski at the Institute For Music And Media.

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Julian Priessen

Shifting
February 2015

The study Shifting by Julian Priessen is comprised of several experimental video clips, the content of which is made up of three parts: video material, image structure and audio material. These are connected to each other through movement, reorganisation and free association. They have equal importance, and it is only through interaction that either the video material, the structure or the audio material comes into focus. The clips therefore gain another level that can be arranged: the relationships of the component parts to each other. These do not, however, compete for attention, but rather work together. No element follows the others. Instead, all levels develop parallel to one another and emerge as a complete work. Even before the actual composition process both the audio and video material should therefore have the same rawness, the same basic nature.

The aim of the work was to explore some of the possibilities offered by this composition principle.

Supervised Shifting in my Visual Music class together with IMM assistant professor Andreas Kolinski at the Institute For Music And Media.

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Aaron Jablonski

Faces
February 2015

Faces is an audiovisual room installation based on an Android app for smartphones and tablet PCs. When looking through the tablet PC, four virtual faces appear on a painted wooden cube suspended from a chain. The four faces slowly change their expression and make different sounds which are generated in the device by granulating audio samples. The work investigates the effect emotional expressions of animated faces have on those viewing these faces.

Using face morphing, the faces can assume many different human emotions and expressions and have a disconcerting and sometimes forbidding effect on the beholder due to their size and immaterial quality. The work thus makes reference to the uncanny valley effect, a concept from the psychology of expressive behavior, primarily used in the assessment of animated characters and robots.
The uncanny valley is a hypothesis in the field of aesthetics which holds that when features look and move almost, but not exactly, like natural beings, it causes a response of revulsion among some observers. The valley refers to the dip in a graph of the comfort level of beings as subjects move toward a healthy, natural likeness described in a function of a subject's aesthetic acceptability. In fact, as similarity with humans increases, there is a dip in the level of empathy felt because the observer feels a sense of revulsion. While an observer gauges a subject having a sufficiently realistic likeness to humans based on human standards, if the human likeness no longer fulfills these human standards, the unnatural aspect of this behavior triggers a sense of revulsion.

Supervised Faces in my Visual Music class together with IMM assistant professor Andreas Kolinski at the Institute For Music And Media.

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Johannes Leppkes

Doppelpendelmusik [Double Pendulum Music]
February 2015

Doppelpendelmusik, an audiovisual installation by Johannes Leppkes, deals with seeing and hearing movement in space. In the darkness, an LED allows the swinging of a sound-producing double pendulum to be seen. The sound and movement of the sound is transferred to the room using a surround sound system.

Supervised Doppelpendelmusik in my Visual Music class together with IMM assistant professor Andreas Kolinski at the Institute For Music And Media.

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Winner: Best German Game

German Computer Game Award 2014
May 2014

Two of my former students, Mareike Ottrand and Fabian Rühle, who studied Motion Design at the Film Academy Baden-Württemberg won with their team the German Computer Game Award for their hilarious and critically acclaimed 2D-Point’n’Click adventure The Inner World. Wow, this is superb, splendid and fantastic. Congratulations!

The Inner World started as their final year project and the company behind it, Studio Fizbin, emerged when two of the owners, Sebastian Mittag and Mareike Ottrand, were still at the Film Academy. Sebastian studied Interactive Media, another super successful program, which is chaired by my wonderful colleague Inga von Staden.

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